Friday, 24 January 2014

PENGUIN DESIGN AWARDS - IDEAS AND DEVELOPMENT

Design boards have been drawn and are shown below. These show the themes within the novel which is where I decided to start my conceptual thinking. I particularly liked the idea of Politics and the contextual elements within the novel which can be shown through imagery and type. I really like to design work to inspire and provoke thought which is something which I follow as a motto and is something I would also like to reflect through the outcome of this brief.



Here I began experimenting with hand rendered type for the title. I was inspired by the vintage type on the What a Carve Up! movie posters, which is something I wanted to subtly reflect in a contemporary manner. I felt that the Serif type shown on the top right (2nd down - above) was very appropriate, and I wanted to expand further with another typeface to compliment the title. I experimented with script as shown below, but felt this was too much with the Serif, and overwhelmed the reader. I then experimented with my everyday handwriting, and and a smaller version of the title type which I am quite fond of. This is also shown below.




Not overly keen on the handwriting used here, as well as it being on an angle, it doesn't look neat, and 'everything' is noticeably thicker than the other text.


Once I had experimented more perfecting the type I wanted to use, I chose to use capitals rather than script handwriting. This is more legible and also much easier to remain the same throughout the entire body copy. I wrote out the testimonials given in the same type as the title, with an italic tag with the reviewer.

I liked the simplicity of this and the subtle vintageness which relates perfectly to that of the film, whilst being totally different to the cover of the book at the moment. I decided to keep these and see what can be done digitally with them for further experimentation and develop.

Type aside, I also began drawing up ideas for the cover of the novel being influenced by research and contextual elements of the novel. 


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