Saturday, 12 April 2014

BUSINESS CARD DEVELOPMENT

I experimented with a range of ideas digitally, before printing any designs, and chose a few to print and develop further. Below shows 4 different types of business cards (1st image only). These were printed at landscape format, at the size of 85x55mm. They were printed onto 100gm white stock, and triplexed with black card. This was to add sturdiness to the cards as well as giving a black and white striped finish down the cut edges of the card. 3 were kept to size, whilst the 4th was trimmed down to frame the logo and the printed information which would be on the back. 

The first two business cards show the photographic images taken to give depth and context to the brand, as well as revealing the brand without showcasing collections so they can be consistent throughout the year, avoiding re-prints and additional print costs. I quite liked the front and the simplistic back which is also shown below. The same principal with a different image were used for the more square card, however felt it wasn't visually relative to the other design elements with the unusual format, and customers/clients may be confused by this. 

The 3rd business card shown has been experimented with using matt black vinyl, however didn't like the overall aesthetic as it felt too much and too over powering for the brand. I love using vinyl and it has been used throughout so would like to develop this further to a create an aesthetically pleasing business card which is interactive in terms of contact details. I thought about using similar methods as to the look book in terms of QR codes and the interactivity between digital and printed media which through my research has shown to be more and more important with luxury brands, especially as some brands only sell via online e-stores, especially if shipping to/from different countries. 


I further experimented with tri-plexing cards at the same size/format initially, and cut more logos out of the vinyl chosen which is matt black. I placed the logo centrally and left it alone, which allowed the logo to breathe and stand alone as a focal point. The background photography can be overwhelming, and didn't want to shower the promotional material with seasonal imagery which would be out of place in S/S and wouldn't be sustainable all year round. I much preferred the simpler approach to design and felt these suited the brand much more appropriately.


On the reverse of the cards I used imagery of the contextual photos opposed to seasonal collection photos. I decided to not place any further body copy. I did this for several reasons. 

1 - I want to increase interaction between digital and print media. The QR code would link directly to the contact page on the website.
2 - It adds excitement and intrigue to the viewer/user.
3 - Given out in store or by PR staff for example, the cards will be delivered to someone aware of the brand or those who have made a purchase, so it adds a little extra touch as well as being useful.

I felt this overall looked smart and links to the look books nicely as previously noted. I feel this version of the business cards is much more suited to the brand, and feels high-quality and high-end especially with the minimal body copy which is generally a trend/rule within fashion brands.  


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